Seattle’s #PeoplesClimate March (2014) + my sign.

The touchstones of Marxist-Situationist theory are these: 
A) That all forms of capitalist society, be they corporate or bureaucratic, are in the final analysis based on the generalized and — at the level of the masses — stable division between directors and executants: those who give orders and those who carry them out. 
B) That subsequent to the total domination and colonialization of nature by technology (a victory that freed mankind from having to struggle to survive), the directorate, its hand forced by capitalism’s need to locate and exploit new raw materials and new markets for its products, began its domination and colonialization of human nature. The only other alternative was for the directorate to admit that the battle against nature had been won and that the directorate itself was no longer necessary or even desirable. 
C) That the domination and colonialization of human nature took the form of a consumption-based society, rather than a production-based society; this “new” society the Situationists called the society of the spectacle. 
D) That the alienation which, in the 19th century, was rooted in economic misery had, in the 20th century, become located in false consciousness.
E) That this false consciousness believes that “everyday life” (i.e., one’s personally selected ensemble of commodities and ideologies) is separate from “history” (i.e., the sum total of that which is accomplished at and by work). And
F) That the society of the spectacle perpetuates itself by compensating those denied the opportunity to make history with more and more commodities, all of which are fundamentally unsatisfying because the ideology of survival remains coded within them.
The touchstones of Marxist-Situationist practice are these: 
A) That during the 1910 to 1925 period, in the form of dadaism and surrealism, modern art had already revealed and, on the plane of ideas, destroyed the workings of the society of the spectacle. 
B) That the failure of modern art, on the plane of actions, to make good its promise to destroy spectacular society is inseparable from the failure of the workers’ movement of that same era. 
C) That post-surrealist modern art, if it doesn’t link up with the workers’ movements of the current era, cannot help but be boring, sterile and openly apologetic for multinational capitalism. 
D) That there is most definitely a modern workers’ movement; the problem is that clinging to outdated notions of who the modern proletariat is prevents everyone from seeing what it is doing. 
E) That the modern proletariat, which more often than not revolts out of boredom, does not yet know that it encompasses nearly everyone. And 
F) That, when situations are constructed (this is the derivation of the term “Situationist”) in which the freedom of modern art is put into practice, the modern proletariat will come to know what it truly is and will realize that it wants to live modern freedom rather than be a spectator of it.
Source: Not Bored! (1983)

The touchstones of Marxist-Situationist theory are these: 

A) That all forms of capitalist society, be they corporate or bureaucratic, are in the final analysis based on the generalized and — at the level of the masses — stable division between directors and executants: those who give orders and those who carry them out. 

B) That subsequent to the total domination and colonialization of nature by technology (a victory that freed mankind from having to struggle to survive), the directorate, its hand forced by capitalism’s need to locate and exploit new raw materials and new markets for its products, began its domination and colonialization of human nature. The only other alternative was for the directorate to admit that the battle against nature had been won and that the directorate itself was no longer necessary or even desirable. 

C) That the domination and colonialization of human nature took the form of a consumption-based society, rather than a production-based society; this “new” society the Situationists called the society of the spectacle. 

D) That the alienation which, in the 19th century, was rooted in economic misery had, in the 20th century, become located in false consciousness.

E) That this false consciousness believes that “everyday life” (i.e., one’s personally selected ensemble of commodities and ideologies) is separate from “history” (i.e., the sum total of that which is accomplished at and by work). And

F) That the society of the spectacle perpetuates itself by compensating those denied the opportunity to make history with more and more commodities, all of which are fundamentally unsatisfying because the ideology of survival remains coded within them.

The touchstones of Marxist-Situationist practice are these: 

A) That during the 1910 to 1925 period, in the form of dadaism and surrealism, modern art had already revealed and, on the plane of ideas, destroyed the workings of the society of the spectacle. 

B) That the failure of modern art, on the plane of actions, to make good its promise to destroy spectacular society is inseparable from the failure of the workers’ movement of that same era. 

C) That post-surrealist modern art, if it doesn’t link up with the workers’ movements of the current era, cannot help but be boring, sterile and openly apologetic for multinational capitalism. 

D) That there is most definitely a modern workers’ movement; the problem is that clinging to outdated notions of who the modern proletariat is prevents everyone from seeing what it is doing. 

E) That the modern proletariat, which more often than not revolts out of boredom, does not yet know that it encompasses nearly everyone. And 

F) That, when situations are constructed (this is the derivation of the term “Situationist”) in which the freedom of modern art is put into practice, the modern proletariat will come to know what it truly is and will realize that it wants to live modern freedom rather than be a spectator of it.

Source: Not Bored! (1983)

Agree on the lucid analysis, disagree on the solution. Lincoln-like figure? Better a 3rd party that clearly stands for the path to S-O-C-I-A-L-I-S-M.
http://www.salon.com/2014/08/24/cornel_west_he_posed_as_a_progressive_and_turned_out_to_be_counterfeit_we_ended_up_with_a_wall_street_presidency_a_drone_presidency/

Agree on the lucid analysis, disagree on the solution. Lincoln-like figure? Better a 3rd party that clearly stands for the path to S-O-C-I-A-L-I-S-M.

http://www.salon.com/2014/08/24/cornel_west_he_posed_as_a_progressive_and_turned_out_to_be_counterfeit_we_ended_up_with_a_wall_street_presidency_a_drone_presidency/

Pablo Iglesias (Podemos, Spain) The issue of the working class. English CC available.

(Source: youtube.com)

unapologeticallydispassionate:

magnus-thegreat-redundancy:

I believe that every american should at least watch this monologue from The Newsroom

This

(via southern-feminism)

bzangy:

Feminist, Marxist, Menshevik, Bolshevik revolutionary ~ ALEXANDRA KOLLONTAI ❤️

From Wikipedia:

Kollontai raised eyebrows with her unflinching advocacy of free love.

However, this does not mean that she advocated casual sexual encounters; indeed, she believed that due to the inequality between men and women that persisted under socialism, such encounters would lead to women being exploited, and being left to raise children alone.

Instead she believed that true socialism could not be achieved without a radical change in attitudes to sexuality, so that it might be freed from the oppressive norms that she saw as a continuation of bourgeois ideas about property.

A common myth quotes her as saying that “…the satisfaction of one’s sexual desires should be as simple as getting a glass of water”; what she actually said, in number 18 of her Theses on Communist Morality in the Sphere of Marital Relations, was that “…sexuality is a human instinct as natural as hunger or thirst.”

Short history of “modern” Spain.

Short history of “modern” Spain.

LONG LIVE THE EQUAL RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN THE USSR! (Poster text)
Before the Soviet revolution:
-9/10 women were illiterate-No women were allowed in schools and universities
“There, although there were ‘hardships and sexual dangers, perhaps pregnancy, for women migrants’ and ‘the market provided only a limited range of poorly-paid and exploitative choices’, a woman could earn an independent wage. Women could become factory workers, domestic servants, physicians, midwives, telegraph workers, and teachers. Some could afford to dress more fashionably, to buy books and attend dance halls, pleasure gardens and theaters and there were few opportunities for education. However, a married woman still owed her husband ‘unlimited obedience’ and required permission before acquiring a job, education or the internal passport needed to reside fifteen miles from her husband’s place of residence. It is clear from Engel’s chapter, and that by Marianna G. Muravyeva, that women resented and fought against these restrictions: 30-40,000 women petitioned the tsar to separate from their husbands. Such petitions could be denied if the women were suspected of ‘immoral behavior’ and the courts were rarely on the side of the women. Violence against women was very common and in cases where a wife was accused of disobeying her husband, the court itself ordered her ten lashes.”
After the Revolution:
-Equal Pay Act-0% illiteracy-Paid maternity and divorce laws-First abortion right law in the world.
The integration of women into the workplace occurred in all sectors. 68% of the medical staff or 72% of teachers were female. At the educational level, being female was no longer an obstacle. Of 10 higher education students, 6 were women.
At the political level, women accounted for 50% of local soviets, 40% in the Soviet Republics and 32% in the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. 37% of the popular judges elected were women, while in the people’s courts represented a 55%.
In the 70s, there were a greater number of women in the productive economy than men. 70% of women worked in the industrial sector, performing skilled functions, which demonstrates a breakthrough in the fight to end sexual division of labor.
While they could have achieved better results in effective gender equality, we must not forget that the USSR was an important example and a mirror to look for progress in other countries. It was always a priority for the Soviet state to end discrimination of women.

LONG LIVE THE EQUAL RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN THE USSR! (Poster text)

Before the Soviet revolution:

-9/10 women were illiterate
-No women were allowed in schools and universities

There, although there were ‘hardships and sexual dangers, perhaps pregnancy, for women migrants’ and ‘the market provided only a limited range of poorly-paid and exploitative choices’, a woman could earn an independent wage. Women could become factory workers, domestic servants, physicians, midwives, telegraph workers, and teachers. Some could afford to dress more fashionably, to buy books and attend dance halls, pleasure gardens and theaters and there were few opportunities for education. However, a married woman still owed her husband ‘unlimited obedience’ and required permission before acquiring a job, education or the internal passport needed to reside fifteen miles from her husband’s place of residence. It is clear from Engel’s chapter, and that by Marianna G. Muravyeva, that women resented and fought against these restrictions: 30-40,000 women petitioned the tsar to separate from their husbands. Such petitions could be denied if the women were suspected of ‘immoral behavior’ and the courts were rarely on the side of the women. Violence against women was very common and in cases where a wife was accused of disobeying her husband, the court itself ordered her ten lashes.”

After the Revolution:

-Equal Pay Act
-0% illiteracy
-Paid maternity and divorce laws
-First abortion right law in the world.

The integration of women into the workplace occurred in all sectors. 68% of the medical staff or 72% of teachers were female. At the educational level, being female was no longer an obstacle. Of 10 higher education students, 6 were women.

At the political level, women accounted for 50% of local soviets, 40% in the Soviet Republics and 32% in the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. 37% of the popular judges elected were women, while in the people’s courts represented a 55%.

In the 70s, there were a greater number of women in the productive economy than men. 70% of women worked in the industrial sector, performing skilled functions, which demonstrates a breakthrough in the fight to end sexual division of labor.

While they could have achieved better results in effective gender equality, we must not forget that the USSR was an important example and a mirror to look for progress in other countries. It was always a priority for the Soviet state to end discrimination of women.

Disinformation, propaganda and alienation doing a great job in France (1945-2004). I bet those results are common to any other western country.

Disinformation, propaganda and alienation doing a great job in France (1945-2004). I bet those results are common to any other western country.

Prologue for “The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914-1991”, Eric Hobsbawm.

Prologue for “The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914-1991”, Eric Hobsbawm.