unapologeticallydispassionate:

magnus-thegreat-redundancy:

I believe that every american should at least watch this monologue from The Newsroom

This

(via southern-feminism)

bzangy:

Feminist, Marxist, Menshevik, Bolshevik revolutionary ~ ALEXANDRA KOLLONTAI ❤️

From Wikipedia:

Kollontai raised eyebrows with her unflinching advocacy of free love.

However, this does not mean that she advocated casual sexual encounters; indeed, she believed that due to the inequality between men and women that persisted under socialism, such encounters would lead to women being exploited, and being left to raise children alone.

Instead she believed that true socialism could not be achieved without a radical change in attitudes to sexuality, so that it might be freed from the oppressive norms that she saw as a continuation of bourgeois ideas about property.

A common myth quotes her as saying that “…the satisfaction of one’s sexual desires should be as simple as getting a glass of water”; what she actually said, in number 18 of her Theses on Communist Morality in the Sphere of Marital Relations, was that “…sexuality is a human instinct as natural as hunger or thirst.”

Short history of “modern” Spain.

Short history of “modern” Spain.

LONG LIVE THE EQUAL RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN THE USSR! (Poster text)
Before the Soviet revolution:
-9/10 women were illiterate-No women were allowed in schools and universities
“There, although there were ‘hardships and sexual dangers, perhaps pregnancy, for women migrants’ and ‘the market provided only a limited range of poorly-paid and exploitative choices’, a woman could earn an independent wage. Women could become factory workers, domestic servants, physicians, midwives, telegraph workers, and teachers. Some could afford to dress more fashionably, to buy books and attend dance halls, pleasure gardens and theaters and there were few opportunities for education. However, a married woman still owed her husband ‘unlimited obedience’ and required permission before acquiring a job, education or the internal passport needed to reside fifteen miles from her husband’s place of residence. It is clear from Engel’s chapter, and that by Marianna G. Muravyeva, that women resented and fought against these restrictions: 30-40,000 women petitioned the tsar to separate from their husbands. Such petitions could be denied if the women were suspected of ‘immoral behavior’ and the courts were rarely on the side of the women. Violence against women was very common and in cases where a wife was accused of disobeying her husband, the court itself ordered her ten lashes.”
After the Revolution:
-Equal Pay Act-0% illiteracy-Paid maternity and divorce laws-First abortion right law in the world.
The integration of women into the workplace occurred in all sectors. 68% of the medical staff or 72% of teachers were female. At the educational level, being female was no longer an obstacle. Of 10 higher education students, 6 were women.
At the political level, women accounted for 50% of local soviets, 40% in the Soviet Republics and 32% in the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. 37% of the popular judges elected were women, while in the people’s courts represented a 55%.
In the 70s, there were a greater number of women in the productive economy than men. 70% of women worked in the industrial sector, performing skilled functions, which demonstrates a breakthrough in the fight to end sexual division of labor.
While they could have achieved better results in effective gender equality, we must not forget that the USSR was an important example and a mirror to look for progress in other countries. It was always a priority for the Soviet state to end discrimination of women.

LONG LIVE THE EQUAL RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN THE USSR! (Poster text)

Before the Soviet revolution:

-9/10 women were illiterate
-No women were allowed in schools and universities

There, although there were ‘hardships and sexual dangers, perhaps pregnancy, for women migrants’ and ‘the market provided only a limited range of poorly-paid and exploitative choices’, a woman could earn an independent wage. Women could become factory workers, domestic servants, physicians, midwives, telegraph workers, and teachers. Some could afford to dress more fashionably, to buy books and attend dance halls, pleasure gardens and theaters and there were few opportunities for education. However, a married woman still owed her husband ‘unlimited obedience’ and required permission before acquiring a job, education or the internal passport needed to reside fifteen miles from her husband’s place of residence. It is clear from Engel’s chapter, and that by Marianna G. Muravyeva, that women resented and fought against these restrictions: 30-40,000 women petitioned the tsar to separate from their husbands. Such petitions could be denied if the women were suspected of ‘immoral behavior’ and the courts were rarely on the side of the women. Violence against women was very common and in cases where a wife was accused of disobeying her husband, the court itself ordered her ten lashes.”

After the Revolution:

-Equal Pay Act
-0% illiteracy
-Paid maternity and divorce laws
-First abortion right law in the world.

The integration of women into the workplace occurred in all sectors. 68% of the medical staff or 72% of teachers were female. At the educational level, being female was no longer an obstacle. Of 10 higher education students, 6 were women.

At the political level, women accounted for 50% of local soviets, 40% in the Soviet Republics and 32% in the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. 37% of the popular judges elected were women, while in the people’s courts represented a 55%.

In the 70s, there were a greater number of women in the productive economy than men. 70% of women worked in the industrial sector, performing skilled functions, which demonstrates a breakthrough in the fight to end sexual division of labor.

While they could have achieved better results in effective gender equality, we must not forget that the USSR was an important example and a mirror to look for progress in other countries. It was always a priority for the Soviet state to end discrimination of women.

Disinformation, propaganda and alienation doing a great job in France (1945-2004). I bet those results are common to any other western country.

Disinformation, propaganda and alienation doing a great job in France (1945-2004). I bet those results are common to any other western country.

Prologue for “The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914-1991”, Eric Hobsbawm.

Prologue for “The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914-1991”, Eric Hobsbawm.

El problema ahora…

El problema ahora…

El juego ha empezado. No hay más remedio que dar comienzo al Terror. Port Burdock ya no obedecerá a la reina, díselo así al coronel y a todos los demás; me obedecerá a mí…, ¡el Terror! Este es el Día Primero, del Año I, de la Nueva Era, la Era del Hombre Invisible. Yo soy Invisible Primero. Al principio será muy sencillo. El primer día habrá una ejecución para que sirva de escarmiento…, la de un hombre llamado Kemp. La muerte le llegará hoy. Podrá encerrarse con llave, esconderse, rodearse de guardias, ponerse una armadura si lo desea… La Muerte, la Muerte Invisible se cierne sobre él. Que tome precauciones; pero no conseguirá con ello más que impresionar al pueblo con mi poder. La Muerte surgirá del buzón de correspondencia al mediodía. La carta caerá en su interior cuando se acerque el cartero. El juego comienza. La Muerte llega. No lo ayuden, pueblo, si no quieren que la Muerte caiga también sobre ustedes. En el día de hoy Kemp ha de morir.
"El hombre invisible", HG Wells (1897)

El juego ha empezado. No hay más remedio que dar comienzo al Terror. Port Burdock ya no obedecerá a la reina, díselo así al coronel y a todos los demás; me obedecerá a mí…, ¡el Terror! Este es el Día Primero, del Año I, de la Nueva Era, la Era del Hombre Invisible. Yo soy Invisible Primero. Al principio será muy sencillo. El primer día habrá una ejecución para que sirva de escarmiento…, la de un hombre llamado Kemp. La muerte le llegará hoy. Podrá encerrarse con llave, esconderse, rodearse de guardias, ponerse una armadura si lo desea… La Muerte, la Muerte Invisible se cierne sobre él. Que tome precauciones; pero no conseguirá con ello más que impresionar al pueblo con mi poder. La Muerte surgirá del buzón de correspondencia al mediodía. La carta caerá en su interior cuando se acerque el cartero. El juego comienza. La Muerte llega. No lo ayuden, pueblo, si no quieren que la Muerte caiga también sobre ustedes. En el día de hoy Kemp ha de morir.

"El hombre invisible", HG Wells (1897)

comicallyvintage:

Never Take Presents From Commies!

comicallyvintage:

Never Take Presents From Commies!

Angela Y. Davis on what’s radical in the 21st century
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/commentary/la-oe-morrison-davis-20140507-column.html#page=1